Tidbits of Truth

A random bit of News Info, The truth about Israel, American politics, & Mideast Foreign Policy... (along with whatever else catches my curiosity).

Thousands of Deadly Islamic Terror Attacks Since 9/11

Top links:

MEMRI: http://www.memri.org/content/en/main.htm
ACT! http://actforamericaeducation.com/
Palestine Facts: http://www.palestinefacts.org/
Shoebat Foundation: http://www.shoebat.com/blog/

Turkish riot police fire water cannon on Istanbul protesters


Thousands gather in Istanbul’s Taksim Square; Erdogan says protesters not respecting Islam

Turkish Prime Minister Tayyip Erdogan told thousands of supporters in the Black Sea city of Samsun on Saturday that weeks of often violent protests against his government had played into the hands of Turkey's enemies.

As he finished speaking, around 10,000 protesters had gathered in Istanbul’s Taksim Square, many of them to attend a planned laying down of carnations in memory of the four people who had been killed in the unrest.

Turkish riot police fired water cannon to clear the protesters from the square, as the crowd chanted “this is just the start; the struggle will continue”.

The crowd quickly scattered, and water cannon trucks parked at several entry points to Taksim to prevent people from regrouping.

People living around the square banged pots and pans, a sign of solidarity with protesters throughout more than three weeks of unrest in Istanbul and other cities across Turkey. Demonstrators shouted “Police, don’t betray your people!”.

 

'Who won?'

In Samsun, a crowd of some 15,000 of Erdogan’s AK Party faithful cheered and waved Turkish flags as he called on the public to give their answer to protests at the ballot box when Turkey holds municipal elections next March.

The rally in the party stronghold was the fourth in a series of mass meetings which Erdogan has called since demonstrations began in Istanbul at the start of June in an unprecedented challenge on the streets to his rule.

The blunt-talking 59-year-old said opponents both within Turkey and abroad had orchestrated the demonstrations, saying an “interest rate lobby” of speculators in financial markets had benefited from the unrest.

"Who won from these three weeks of protests? The interest rate lobby, Turkey’s enemies," Erdogan said from a stage emblazoned with his portrait and a slogan calling for his supporters to "thwart the big game" played out against Turkey.

"Who lost from these protests? Turkey’s economy, even if to a small extent, tourism lost. They overshadowed and stained Turkey’s image and international power," he said.

In a speech appealing to his conservative grassroots support, Erdogan made fresh accusations that those involved in the protests in Turkey’s main western cities were disrespectful towards Islam, the religion of the vast majority of Turkey.

"Let them go into mosques in their shoes, let them drink alcohol in our mosques, let them raise their hand to our headscarved girls. One prayer from our people is enough to frustrate their plans," Erdogan said, before tossing red carnations to the crowd after his speech.

Turkish society polarized?

The protests have underlined divisions in Turkish society between religious conservatives who form the bedrock of Erdogan’s support, and more liberal Turks who have swelled the ranks of peaceful demonstrators.

Erdogan, who won his third consecutive election in 2011 with 50 percent support, has been riled by the open show of dissent, and sees himself as a champion of democratic reform.

During his 10-year rule, which has seen him unchallenged on the political stage, he has enacted reforms that include curbing powers of an army that toppled four governments in four decades and pursuing an end to 30 years of Kurdish rebellion.

But he brooks little dissent. Hundreds of military officers have been jailed on charges of plotting a coup against Erdogan.

A court near Istanbul said on Friday it will announce on August 5 its verdict on nearly 300 defendants, including academics, journalists and politicians, accused of separate plots to overthrow the government.

But among the large section of Turkey’s 76 million people who do not back him, Erdogan is viewed as increasingly authoritarian and too quick to meddle in their private lives.

Recent restrictions on the sale of alcohol have fueled their suspicions that he has a creeping Islamist agenda.

That resentment spilled into open protest when police cracked down on a group of environmentalists opposed to his plans to develop a central Istanbul park in late May, spreading to other cities and turning violent night after night.

Sporadic clashes have continued in some cities this week, but Istanbul has been calm as many people adopted a silent show of defiance inspired by the so-called “Standing Man” protester.

On Sunday, Erdogan will address a rally in the eastern city of Erzurum, also an AK Party stronghold.

At Fourth Annual ‘Women in the World’ Conference, Hillary Clinton still talking about the ‘hope of the Arab Spring’

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton appeared at the Women in the World conference in New York City this past week to talk about the fight for women’s rights. In the short excerpt of her speech below she actually talked about fighting for women’s rights in Afghanistan AFTER U.S. troops leave.

Uh, the how behind that statement was conspicuously absent.

What Clinton didn’t discuss was the case of Homaidan Al-Turki, a Saudi who is serving a prison sentence in a Colorado state prison for enslaving and molesting a young Indonesian girl. Al-Turki was convicted in 2006 and recently attempted to get transferred set free to Saudi Arabia. Al-Turki’s name was in the news for a couple of days after the murder of Tom Clements, the Executive Director of Colorado’s Department of Corrections.

It would have been nice to see Clinton take the opportunity to insist that Al-Turki never be transferred to Saudi Arabia. After all, by doing so, Hillary would be standing up for women’s rights.

Via the Daily Beast:

To watch the entire speech – if you can stand it – click here.

jewishpolitics:

girlactionfigure:

The Arab Spring Islamist Governments Work To Destroy The Last Remnants Of Any Jewish Presence

When the Arab Spring first began, the usual suspects hailed it as the birth of new ‘Arab Democracy’. And even when Islamist governments took over, the same suspects, notably in the Obama Administration assured everyone that these particular Islamists were pragmatists, and committed to democratic government, in spite of all the evidence that Islam and what we would think of as democracy don’t really mix in the least.Further evidence of what the Arab Spring and the accompanying Islamist governments are really about surfaced in how Tunisia and Egypt are treating the remnants of their Jewish communities.Tunisia has an ancient community of Jews that once numbered 110,000 at its peak. Today, there are about 2,000 left. Under the old Ben Ali government, Tunisia’s Jews enjoyed freedom of worship and relative tolerance. But with the new Islamist Ennahda government, that’s changing rapidly.Tunisia’s new Islamist parliament is working to pass a law that will prohibit the import of religious books, kosher food, and even visitors from Israel, thus isolating the community:In an interview with Makor Rishon, Rav Haim Biton, Chief Rabbi of the Jewish community in Tunisia said, “Today, the government lets us bring in food, medicine, religious and educational books from Israel. If this law passes, our condition will completely change.”He continued on to say that they are trying to explain to the government that if the law passes, in a few months from now, their relatives from Israel won’t be able to visit, they will not have much needed kosher food items, and, of course, they won’t be able to bring in religious and educational materials.Other community members were less optimistic as they believe this is the government trying to cut off Jews from their culture. “Behind this law to prohibit the import of kosher products and visiting relatives is their desire to cut off our connection to Israel,” they said.In November, Tunisia passed a separate law limiting NGOs to importing medicine only from foreign sources in with diplomatic ties with Tunisia, which, obviously, excluded Israel.Despite the fact that the new proposed law hasn’t yet been passed, Israeli citizens who have requested permission to visit Tunisia recently have been repeatedly turned down, while eight months ago, they could visit.Reportedly Tunisian-born Israeli vice prime minister Silvan Shalom had previously appealed back in December to what’s left of Tunisian Jewry to immigrate to Israel, but met some resistance even though there were signs that endemic Islamist Jew hatred was becoming more common. If this new law passes, it may be a matter of them getting out while they can.In Egypt, the situation is different. Unlike Tunisia, Egypt actually had formal relations with Israel.Egypt has already ethnically cleansed almost all of its Jews, with less than one hundred remaining in the country, most of them elderly. The two main communities, or rather what’s left of them are in Cairo and Alexandria. The last Jewish wedding in Egypt took place in 1984, at the old Jewish synagogue is Chaar Hashamaim, in downtown Cairo.In Alexandria there is a small community of 18 women and 4 men, all of them aged between 70 and 90. This year will be different for them because for the first time, the Islamist government of Egypt is not going to allow a Rabbi or Cantor from Israel or enough Jewish men from Israel to enter the country for Rosh Hashona and Yom Kippur services at Alexandria’s last remaining synagogue, Eliahou Hanavi.Jewish religious worship requires a minyan, ten Jewish men in order to properly conduct services. Critical parts of the service cannot be done without it. This will be the first time in 2,000 years that there will be no minyan in Alexandria.The remaining elderly Jews will attempt to hold services themselves, as best they can.The Egyptian government justified this on the grounds of ‘security’. What that actually means is, just as with the Israeli embassy in Cairo, they’re unwilling to protect Jews coming in to Egypt to visit, or to allow a few elderly Jews a feeling of community as they have every year since the Israeli Egyptian peace treaty.There’s a frequent saying bandied about by people who call themselves liberals that a society can be judged by the freedom accorded the least of its members.Considering that many of these same people are still agog over the Arab Spring, I’m curious about how they’d rate the so-called democratic societies of Tunisia and Egypt.
JoshuaPundit

 I guess tolerance only goes so far. G-d I hope they get out. They should get out

jewishpolitics:

girlactionfigure:

The Arab Spring Islamist Governments Work To Destroy The Last Remnants Of Any Jewish Presence



When the Arab Spring first began, the usual suspects hailed it as the birth of new ‘Arab Democracy’. And even when Islamist governments took over, the same suspects, notably in the Obama Administration assured everyone that these particular Islamists were pragmatists, and committed to democratic government, in spite of all the evidence that Islam and what we would think of as democracy don’t really mix in the least.

Further evidence of what the Arab Spring and the accompanying Islamist governments are really about surfaced in how Tunisia and Egypt are treating the remnants of their Jewish communities.

Tunisia has an ancient community of Jews that once numbered 110,000 at its peak. Today, there are about 2,000 left. Under the old Ben Ali government, Tunisia’s Jews enjoyed freedom of worship and relative tolerance. But with the new Islamist Ennahda government, that’s changing rapidly.

Tunisia’s new Islamist parliament is working to pass a law that will prohibit the import of religious books, kosher food, and even visitors from Israel, thus isolating the community:

In an interview with Makor Rishon, Rav Haim Biton, Chief Rabbi of the Jewish community in Tunisia said, “Today, the government lets us bring in food, medicine, religious and educational books from Israel. If this law passes, our condition will completely change.”

He continued on to say that they are trying to explain to the government that if the law passes, in a few months from now, their relatives from Israel won’t be able to visit, they will not have much needed kosher food items, and, of course, they won’t be able to bring in religious and educational materials.

Other community members were less optimistic as they believe this is the government trying to cut off Jews from their culture. “Behind this law to prohibit the import of kosher products and visiting relatives is their desire to cut off our connection to Israel,” they said.

In November, Tunisia passed a separate law limiting NGOs to importing medicine only from foreign sources in with diplomatic ties with Tunisia, which, obviously, excluded Israel.

Despite the fact that the new proposed law hasn’t yet been passed, Israeli citizens who have requested permission to visit Tunisia recently have been repeatedly turned down, while eight months ago, they could visit.


Reportedly Tunisian-born Israeli vice prime minister Silvan Shalom had previously appealed back in December to what’s left of Tunisian Jewry to immigrate to Israel, but met some resistance even though there were signs that endemic Islamist Jew hatred was becoming more common. If this new law passes, it may be a matter of them getting out while they can.

In Egypt, the situation is different. Unlike Tunisia, Egypt actually had formal relations with Israel.

Egypt has already ethnically cleansed almost all of its Jews, with less than one hundred remaining in the country, most of them elderly. The two main communities, or rather what’s left of them are in Cairo and Alexandria. The last Jewish wedding in Egypt took place in 1984, at the old Jewish synagogue is Chaar Hashamaim, in downtown Cairo.

In Alexandria there is a small community of 18 women and 4 men, all of them aged between 70 and 90. This year will be different for them because for the first time, the Islamist government of Egypt is not going to allow a Rabbi or Cantor from Israel or enough Jewish men from Israel to enter the country for Rosh Hashona and Yom Kippur services at Alexandria’s last remaining synagogue, Eliahou Hanavi.

Jewish religious worship requires a minyan, ten Jewish men in order to properly conduct services. Critical parts of the service cannot be done without it. This will be the first time in 2,000 years that there will be no minyan in Alexandria.

The remaining elderly Jews will attempt to hold services themselves, as best they can.

The Egyptian government justified this on the grounds of ‘security’. What that actually means is, just as with the Israeli embassy in Cairo, they’re unwilling to protect Jews coming in to Egypt to visit, or to allow a few elderly Jews a feeling of community as they have every year since the Israeli Egyptian peace treaty.

There’s a frequent saying bandied about by people who call themselves liberals that a society can be judged by the freedom accorded the least of its members.

Considering that many of these same people are still agog over the Arab Spring, I’m curious about how they’d rate the so-called democratic societies of Tunisia and Egypt.

JoshuaPundit

 I guess tolerance only goes so far. G-d I hope they get out. They should get out

(via thecynincspensieve)

Report: Army of Islam Behind Egypt Terror Attack

Wreckage of APC from terror attack.
Wreckage of APC from terror attack.
Israel news photo: Flash 90

The terror group Army of Islam is behind Sunday’s terror attack in the Sinai Peninsula, a Qatari website reported on Thursday.

According to the report in the Bawaba Ash-Sharq website, Egyptian security forces investigating the attack in which 16 Egyptian officers were killed, have concluded that Army of Islam members carried it out. Army of Islam is an Al-Qaeda inspired Gaza-based terrorist group that wishes to see Gaza run by Muslim Sharia law.

According to the report, the terrorists came to an Egyptian army position in Rafiah in three vehicles and were dressed in olive-colored uniforms and shoes similar to those worn by Egyptian soldiers. Four terrorists emerged from the first vehicle and between eight and ten emerged from the other two.

The four terrorists opened fire at Egyptian soldiers who were eating the meal marking the end of the Ramadan fast day and shot them in the head, said the report. They then entered one of the armored vehicles, forcing one of the Egyptian soldiers to drive it and shooting him dead after a few kilometers.

Between eight and ten terrorists wearing explosive belts were in a fourth vehicle which tried to enter Israel through the Kerem Shalom crossing, the report said. One of the terrorists stayed in the vehicle and the rest tried to reach the Israeli position at the border crossing in an Egyptian armored vehicle. Three of them set off the explosive belts they were wearing when they discovered a glitch in the armored vehicle. Another armored vehicle was destroyed by the Israeli Air Force and the third vehicle blew up, and six charred bodies were found inside it.

Egypt has launched a crackdown on Sinai terrorism in response to the attack. Residents of El Arish in northern Sinai reported Thursday that the Egyptian military has sent reinforcements of “unprecedented” size into the peninsula.

The forces reportedly include 60 tanks on 30 tank-transporters, 12 armored personnel carriers, 15 additional armored vehicles, more than 20 armored jeeps and 10 Military Police jeeps.

The head of Egyptian intelligence, Mourad Mowafy, admitted on Tuesday that Egypt had received intelligence about Sunday’s attack on the Egypt-Israel border before it took place, but said that “we never imagined that a Muslim would kill a Muslim during the meal to end the Ramadan fast day.”

Mowafy was later fired by Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi, who has vowed to avenge the deaths of the murdered soldiers.

Egypt’s Mursi defies Military; youth who led Revolution silent

The news about this story that’s making the headlines is that Egypt’s Mohammed Mursi has defied the Military’s dissolution of the Parliament and is reimplementing it.

However, there is something else that CNN reported almost as a backstory that should perhaps get far more attention.

Check out this report from CNN. The topic of conversation is that Mursi is overstepping his authority and that the people who wanted revolution are extremely concerned. Pay close attention at the 2:30 mark as CNN’s Ali Velshi brings up the fact that last year’s uprising was driven by the “youth”. Take note of the reporter’s response. The “youth” is basically absent and not participating in the government they helped put into power.

Via CNN (h/t Hot Air):

Again, because this excerpt from Andrew McCarthy’s book – The Grand Jihad – is often so salient, it applies again in this instance:

Revolutionaries of Islam and the Left make fast friends when there is a common enemy to besiege. Leftists, however are essentially nihilists who hazy vision prioritizes power over what is to be done with power. They are biddable. Islamists, who have very settled convictions about what is to be done with power, are much less so. Even their compromises keep their long-term goals in their sights. Thus do Leftists consistently overrate their ability to control Islamists. Factoring the common denominator, power, out of the equation, something always beats nothing.

The American left shouldn’t just take heed of what’s happening in Egypt; it should also take heed of McCarthy’s words.

BBC Wakes up; admits mistakes in ‘Arab Spring’ Coverage

The ‘Arab Spring’ began in January of 2011. The mainstream media cheered. Here we are in June of 2012 and the BBC is finally starting to scratch its head while saying, ‘Gee, duh, maybe we were wrong. Duh.’

Via the Daily Mail:

The BBC’s coverage of the Arab Spring has been heavily criticised – by the corporation’s bosses.

Head of news Helen Boaden admitted that her journalists got carried away with events and produced ‘over-excited’ reports.

She told a BBC Trust report that in Libya, where reporters were ‘embedded’ with rebels, they may have failed to explore both sides of the story properly.

Middle East editor Jeremy Bowen was among those criticized in the study into coverage of the uprisings, which found that ‘excitement’ did sometimes ‘infect’ the reporting, which some viewers described as ‘too emotive’ and ‘veering into opinion’.

The document, published yesterday, also raised concerns about the corporation’s use of footage filmed on mobile phones and other user-generated content. It noted that the BBC failed to warn viewers with ‘caveats’ about the ‘authenticity’ of such footage in 74 per cent of cases.

It also warned that the corporation ignored events in some countries as it concentrated on ‘big’ stories.

Miss Boaden is quoted saying: ‘In the conflict in Egypt in the beginning . . . we might have sounded over-excited – you can take on the colour of who you’re with. I had to say “just be careful about your tone”.

‘In Libya too, where we were essentially embedded [with the rebels] at the start, we might have sounded over-excited – you have to be careful if you can’t get to the other side of the story.’

While the report found that overall the BBC’s coverage was ‘generally impartial’, it did raise concerns about aspects of its reporting.

Unlike John McCain, it appears that the BBC has admitted it was wrong about the ‘Arab Spring’.

(Source: thegatewaypundit.com)

Exposed: The Formula for Islamic Takeover

By Walid Shoebat and Ben Barrack

The word “Democracy” has become increasingly and deceptively powerful. It has come to be seen as something on par with “freedom” and “justice.” It has been the fuel for the very inaptly named ‘Arab Spring.’ Democracy and freedom are not synonymous terms. They don’t mean the same thing at all. The forces at work that support the ‘Arab Spring’ know this but they don’t want the world to know it. After all, war is deception.

The now infamous ‘Bush Doctrine’ evolved from a policy that gave the United States the right to preemptively defend itself to something that sought the promotion of Democracy all across the Middle East. This policy of Democracy was applied to Afghanistan, Iraq, and the Gaza Strip. The result has been far less than spectacular. Afghanistan has written a Constitution that identifies Islamic law as the law of the land. Ditto Iraq, which has also, essentially, become annexed by Iran. Gaza, after being handed over to the Palestinians, democratically elected Hamas to lead it.

Democracy birthed religious tyranny. Does that sound like a formula for freedom and justice?

Since George W. Bush left office, the Middle East has eagerly co-opted and embraced his doctrine, implementing it on its own terms. In Egypt, the country overwhelmingly elected the Muslim Brotherhood to have more seats in Parliament than any other Party and will soon decide if the country will have a Muslim Brotherhood President or one who was Prime Minister under Hosni Mubarak. The “Democratic” uprising that took place in Egypt will give them more of the same or something much worse. Perhaps this offers some insight into why Bush recently doubled down on his doctrine in a Wall Street Journal Op-ed, in which he wrote positively about the ‘Arab Spring’ while encouraging people to ‘embrace freedom’ in the Middle East.

Egypt’s Muslim Brotherhood has laughably identified its political arm as the Freedom and Justice Party. Like the ‘Arab Spring,’ the term does not in any way, shape, matter or form accurately identify the Party. On the contrary, ‘Freedom and Justice’ is antithetical to what the Brotherhood stands for, especially for those who are not Muslim.

In Democracy, the majority rules but what if the majority wishes to subjugate or persecute the minority? It’s still Democracy but is that freedom and justice for all built on a foundational belief that all men are created equal? Hardly. Conversely, what if a minority is in power that seeks to control the majority, in part, to prevent its own subjugation or persecution? This was the case in Saddam Hussein’s Iraq and it is the case in Bashar al-Assad’s Syria.

When Kurds in the Qamishli Province rose up against Assad and the Arabist Ba’ath in the spring of 2004 and were slaughtered, Syrian Arabs of all stripes remained quiet. What about the Libyan Berbers, black African Sudanese and the Kurds in Turkey and Iraq? Hundreds of thousands have been massacred. As Gadhafi was fending off rebels in Libya, US Senator John McCain walked past the main courthouse in Benghazi to cheers from Libyan rebels. Two weeks earlier, rebels had hung a black man upside down and beheaded him at that very site. It was during this visit that McCain referred to those rebels as his ‘heroes,’ presumably because they were clamoring for Democracy.

Apparently, it’s easier to get away with beheading black Libyans if you do so in the name of Democracy. Since then, there has been an overwhelming abundance of Al-Qaeda flags flying all over post-Gadhafi Libya.

Let freedom ring, right Mr. McCain? Does calling it ‘Democracy’ help you sleep better?

Where was Senator McCain, a staunch advocate of supporting the Sunni rebels in Syria (he obviously hasn’t learned from his mistake in Libya), when Syria was against freedom in Lebanon?

Is it only freedom for Sunni Islamists? The majority? If the Assad regime is toppled, non-Arabs such as Kurds in Syria and the Copts in Egypt, will be massacred by Arabists/Islamists. Perhaps these massacres will be the desire of the majority but it is a self-evident truth that there will not be freedom and justice for all. The Arab Ba’ath in neighboring Iraq killed hundreds of thousands of Kurds under Saddam over the years as well.

According to a new report in Germany’s leading daily, the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (FAZ), the recent Houla massacre in Syria was in fact committed by anti-Assad Sunni militants, and the bulk of the victims were members of the Alawi and Shia minorities, which have been largely supportive of Assad. For its account of the massacre, the report cites opponents of Assad who declined to have their names appear in print out of fear of reprisals from armed opposition groups.

According to the article’s sources, the massacre occurred after rebel forces attacked three army-controlled roadblocks outside of Houla. The roadblocks had been set up to protect nearby Alawi majority villages from attacks by Sunni militias. The rebel attacks provoked a call for reinforcements by the besieged army units. Syrian army and rebel forces are reported to have engaged in battle for some 90 minutes, during which time “dozens of soldiers and rebels” were killed.

Democracy is not an end in itself but this is what leftists and Islamists want the world to believe. In reality, Democracy is a means to an end and in the Middle East, that end inevitably involves religious tyranny.

As Bill Wilson explains at the Daily Jolt, Islamists have a formula that follows a consensus that Democracy is inherently and exclusively good. We have inserted a couple of steps into Wilson’s formula. Ours are in bold:

  • Muslims begin protesting their evil leader
  • Evil leader cracks down
  • Muslims gain worldwide sympathy
  • Evil leader is deposed
  • US leaders suggest democracy
  • Muslims use Muruna to suggest the Turkish Model of Islamic Democracy
  • US / Western leaders oversee the transition to Islamic “Democracy” (moderate Islam)
  • Islamic Sharia Law leaders are elected
  • Democracy is abandoned
  • Sharia Law is established

The Turkish Model is really the trojan horse the west continues to welcome. It allows western leaders to fool themselves into believing that there is a moderate version of Islam which embraces western values. This deceptive perception is so effective because it begins with a premise that eschews Islamic fundamentalism. In reality, that Islamic fundamentalism lays dormant as non-Muslims embrace it.

That is what makes muruna so effective; it is a technique very similar to the Shiite tactic known as taqiyya. Muruna is the Sunni / Muslim Brotherhood version. When practiced, it allows Muslims to abandon the very tenets of their faith if it lowers the guard of others. As a result, Islam is advanced. Turkey has also been very successful at minimizing the tumultuous change that has taken place within its walls over the last ten years. The very secular Kemalist government has been overthrown through… you guessed it, Democracy.

Every one of the countries that have seen dictators fall as a result of the ‘Arab Spring’ subsequently began to look glowingly at the example set by Turkey, which has basically watched as these nations have essentially come to them, all in the name of Democracy. An undeniable fringe benefit is that the West has facilitated much of it, particularly in Egypt and Libya, as Turkey has expended little capital while reaping what it no doubt believes will be huge, future returns.

Walid Shoebat is author of For God or For Tyranny

(Source: shoebat.com)

Mob Logic in Egypt: Angry at Mubarak’s sentence? Sexually Assault innocent women

Last year, after Mubarak fell, Egyptians celebrated in Tahrir Square. A mob of approximately 200 nearly killed CBS Reporter Lara Logan during a sustained and violent sexual assault; her assailants apparently justified their actions by mentally transforming her into a Jew.

It appears that such attacks are now on the rise in Egypt.

The reason? Hosni Mubarak’s sentence is considered to be too light.

Via MSNBC:

Her screams were not drowned out by the clamor of the crazed mob of nearly 200 men around her. An endless number of hands reached toward the woman in the red shirt in an assault scene that lasted less than 15 minutes but felt more like an hour.

She was pushed by the sea of men for about a block into a side street from Tahrir Square. Many of the men were trying to break up the frenzy, but it was impossible to tell who was helping and who was assaulting. Pushed against the wall, the unknown woman’s head finally disappeared. Her screams grew fainter, then stopped. Her slender tall frame had clearly given way. She apparently had passed out.

The helping hands finally splashed the attackers with bottles of water to chase them away.

The assault late Tuesday was witnessed by an Associated Press reporter who was almost overwhelmed by the crowd herself and had to be pulled to safety by men who ferried her out of the melee in an open Jeep.

Reports of assaults on women in Tahrir, the epicenter of the uprising that forced Hosni Mubarak to step down last year, have been on the rise with a new round of mass protests to denounce a mixed verdict against the ousted leader and his sons in a trial last week.

The lesson appears to be that if you’re a female in Tahrir Square who is the victim of a sexual assault, don’t blame your assailants.

Blame Hosni Mubarak

h/t Hot Air

Jihadists take over Syrian Christian village; residents expelled

Yesterday, it was reported that Republican George W. Bush suggested that the Arab Spring should be embraced. Meanwhile, Christians all over the Middle East are being sacrificed because of that mentality.

Via AINA:

Armed jihadist seized control of Qastal al-Burg village on Thursday, May 10, and ordered its 10 Christian families to leave, according to a report published by UPI on its Arabic language website.

A resident of the village, who did not wish to be identified, said “armed jihadist (expiatory) group came to the village and ordered us to leave our homes empty handed.” The armed group, he further stated, “have exercised their control over all the houses, and occupied the church and made it as their command control center.”

Another Republican – John McCain – continues to call for these savages to be armed.

George W. Bush’s disturbing take on the ‘Arab Spring’

After having eight years to study the motivations of America’s Islamic enemies, George W. Bush both curiously and disturbingly expressed a rather uneducated opinion relative to the ‘Arab Spring.’

Via MSNBC:

A stone’s throw away from the White House, former President George W. Bush said today the world is in an “extraordinary” time for freedom and that the changes of the Arab Spring should be embraced despite the uncertain future that comes with them.

Bush said those who say the dangers of democratic change are too great and that America should be in favor of stability over change are unrealistic.

“In the long run, this foreign-policy approach is not realistic,” Bush argued, “It is not realistic to presume that so-called stability enhances our national security. Nor is it within the power of America to indefinitely preserve the old order, which is inherently unstable.”

Bush advocated a clear stand.

“American’s message should ring clear and strong,” Bush said. “We stand for freedom — and for the institutions and habit that make freedom work for everyone.”

Is that the same kind of freedom that put Hamas in control of Gaza?

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